Circuit Training Workouts

In a world where being creative is a must if you want to prevent boredom, this is where I come in and enlighten your day and workout. I strive to help people find their wings in the gym, to find exercises and training modules that work best for them individually — because everyone is an individual. It is easy to get caught up in the hustle & bustle of trying to find a workout that gives you results, keeps you entertained, challenges you & at the very best teaches you something new about your body and your limits. Many people do the same thing in and out, don’t see results and don’t feel challenged because they are afraid to push themselves (coming from experience, this is due to many things) but once you hop over that obstacle, you find that there is so many options and not all of them are alike, which intrigues you enough to want to give it a go.  Well, if you are ready to hop over that obstacle today, I have something that might intrigue you enough to give it a go. 

 

Circuit training is a fancy term for doing an abundance of exercises (typically 2 or more that are high intensity) that require you doing them in a timed situation OR a high intensity exercise that is done (typically 2 or more)  without a break between for a certain amount of reps .. for example:

 

Example One:

 
  1. Burpees: 10 reps
  2. Jumping Jacks: 10 reps
  3. Push ups: 10 reps

Having to do these all without a break between, one after the other for a certain amount of rounds

 

OR

 

Example Two:

  1. Burpees: 30 seconds
  2. Jumping Jacks: 1 minute
  3. Push ups: 30 seconds

You are having to do these exercises within a certain amount of time — and recording your results, again this would require no break in between exercises. Another option would be.. 

 

Example Three:

Do 4 of these exercises within 20 minutes of time:

  1. Pull ups: 100
  2. push ups: 50
  3. burpees: 100
  4. Kettlebell swings: 150

Basically a lot of Crossfit athletes do these and have another term for it, but it is a form of circuit– the difference being you have 20 minutes total to finish the 4 of these exercises with the amount of reps– during my CrossFit class, we didn’t have a break between .. it was ongoing, sure I could stop and catch my breathe but I was trying to beat the timer, so I didn’t want to take long breaks if I wanted to succeed in the workout. Time was of the essence. 

 

Circuit training can come in all forms: cardio, strength exercises and a combination of both. You can also choose to use machines if you aren’t comfortable using free weights OR you can use body weight exercises (which means you can do them at home). Depending on your fitness level and the equipment available to you, it could be a fun workout to take on and you can change it up however you like to meet your needs. 

 

Pros of Circuit training:

  • Increases endurance
  • Increased muscular endurance
  • strength building 
  • can utilize weight machines, free weights or body weight
  • can be done at home or the gym
  • challenges you
  • lose fat while maintaining strength
  • Beginners, intermediate or advanced athletes
  • cardio, strength or a combination of both— depending on your goals

In my opinion, it is a great option for those of you who might need to turn up the fun factor in your workouts, need a challenge, want something new, great for partner workouts — where you both train together, and if you are new to exercise, it can help get you started in the right direction. I use circuit training more often than not, especially when I am doing CrossFit based workouts, or want to add some high intensity volume training. Definitely worthy of giving a go! 

 

Feel free to share, comment, like and follow!

 

Whats your favorite circuit training workout? 

 
 
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Wall Ball Squat| CrossFit It Out

Going back to my CrossFit days when I was introduced to “Wall Ball Squats” — for the life of me,  I did not realize they would be a challenging workout; I figured what is so hard about squatting and throwing a ball against a wall BUT boy was I wrong! hard workout and definitely made to be challenging. Eventually I will get back into CrossFit and visit my local box BUT it won’t be because of Wall balls, LOL 

For any of my CrossFit athletes out there, then you know the struggle and for any of my recreational gym goers this is an exercise to amp up your leg day and core as well 🙂 

but obviously you can purchase them elsewhere as well, but the reason behind using these balls is because of the cushion compared to regular medicine balls made of hard rubber that would go bouncing off the walls, they don’t look fierce but these balls don’t play games with competitors. LOL 

 

So besides that, how does one do a proper wall ball squat? 

 
 
  1. Stand feet shoulder width apart while facing the wall with the “wall ball in hand”. Make sure to keep shoulders back and chest up high, standing 3-5 ft away from the wall (approximately) 
  2. Descent into a squat position, continue down until upper legs are below parallel to the floor (inhale during this time)
  3. Drive through heels to ascend, at the same time push the medicine ball up towards the wall while fully extending the arms. Aim to throw the ball 10-12 ft in front of you (although it depends the height of the ceiling)
  4. Catch the ball and return to the starting position. 

What muscles am I working?

  • Quads
  • glutes
  • calves
  • hamstrings
  • abs
  • lower back
  • chest
  • front deltoids
  • rear deltoids
  • biceps
  • triceps

Very good workout for the muscle groups and definitely can be done with beginners, just use a smaller weight and start off throwing the ball as a decent height and gradually progress as you get stronger and get the movement down.

 

Leave your experience in the comments!

 

Shay-lon

Powerlifting Deload|Week Four|Day Two

  • Conventional deadlift: 3 x 5

 

  • 40% of 90% of 1-RM: 100 lb
  • 50% of 90% of 1-RM: 125 lb
  • 60% of 90% of 1-RM: 150 lb

 

  • Smith machine calf raises: 5 x 8, 165 lb
  • Smith machine rack pulls: 5 x 8, 205 lb
  • DB romanian deadlift: 5 x 8, 50 lb
  • One legged kettlebell deadlift: 5 x 8 each leg, 10kg
  • barbell stiff-legged deadlift: 5 x 8, 135 lb

 

Monday|Deload Week 4|Day One

I will just mention that DELOAD week means lesser weights — so my deload week will be with my core lifts and assistance exercises as well; normally it will be around 40-60 percent of my 1-RM. 

 
 
  • Standing barbell shoulder press: 3 x 5

 

  • 40% of 90% of 1-RM: 30 lb
  • 50% of 90% of 1-RM: 40 lb
  • 60% of 90% of 1-RM: 45 lb

 

I had to use the EZ bar for the first two because the barbell weights 45 lb

 
  • Clean & Press: 5 x 8, 6, 3, 100 lb
  • Standing DB straight arm front delt raise above head: 5 x 8, 20 lb
  • Arnold DB press: 5 x 8, 40 lb

Cardio

Four rounds of:

  1. Jumping jacks: 60 reps
  2. burpees: 20 reps

Monday marks a HUGE accomplishment for me. I performed a clean press for the first time and was able to do 100 lb, I have never push pressed 100 lb before, let alone doing it with the clean at the same time. I did take a video of me performing 4 reps: https://www.instagram.com/shaylon_fitnesswonderwoman/?hl=en (scroll down the IG a few and you will see the video) I feel really good about it and hopefully my weights will continue to increase along with my strength. 

 

My Sumo Deadlifts are BEHIND

For those of you who may not know or haven’t figured it out – my Sumo deadlifts are a week BEHIND the rest of my core lifts because I started sumo deadlifts a week later, so technically Saturday would have been the last heavy load for the week BUT for sumo deadlifts it wasn’t the last day, I have this week for heavy loads for sumo and then next week will be deload day for sumo deadlifts (so technically I might be 2 weeks behind on sumo deadlifts) — it’s fine though. 

 
 
  • Sumo Deadlift: 3 x 3

 

  • 70% of 90% of 1-RM: 140 lb
  • 80% of 90% of 1-RM: 160 lb
  • 90% of 90% of 1-RM: 182 lb

 

  • Power clean: 3 x 5, 100 lb
  • hammer curls: 3 x 8, 60 lb
  • DB curls: 3 x 8, 60 lb 

Cardio:

  • Upright stationary bike: 20 minute (interval)
  1. 2 min, level 15
  2. 1 minute, level 8
 

 

Long Leg Day

I would just like to mention that today’s leg day was written down a lot harder than what I got finished within 3 hours. I know it seems like a long day, but that includes the breaks, because this week is all heavy lifting, which means longer rest periods. I don’t ever plan on being at a gym for more than 1 hour, but since training for powerlifting, I have been inside a gym no less than 2 hours .. which probably is normal depending on your fitness level and your workouts. I know many days I have a cardio and lift that (so take that into consideration) most lifters don’t like doing their cardio on the same days as lifting. I am an odd ball and so far have been able to handle it. I will also mention that some days I have a gym partner (now); I guess that is what happens when you make new friends at the gym, they then decide it would be cool to lift with you and thank goodness she lifts just as much or heavier than me.. so it hasn’t been bad at all, considering I am usually a lone wolf when I workout and I liked it. Many times my workout sets or reps get cut because she wants to shorten the gym period but very rarely will I be doing that because we have different goals in mind and I need to focus on my overall goal  to put it lightly. Regardless, it has been nice to have a gym partner every once in a while to keep me motivated and help spot me. 

 
 
  • barbell back squat: 

 

  • 75% of 90% of my 1-RM: 3 x 5, 135 lb
  • 85% of 90% of my 1-RM: 3 x 3, 155 lb
  • 95% of my 90% of my 1-RM: 3 x 1, 170 lb
  • 95% of my true 1-RM (singles): 3 x 1, 190 lb

 

  • Jump squats: 2 x 25-30 seconds
  • leg press: 5 x 20, 208 lb
  • DB goblet squats: 3 x 15, 25 lb
  • Barbell front squats: 3 x 10, 6, 12, 95 lb, 55 lb

P.S I also implemented foam rolling and stretching along with my warm up in the beginning of my workout — yay 🙂

 

Rewind to Wednesday

  • Barbell bench press: 

 

  • 75% of 90% of 1-RM: 3 x 5, 85 lb
  • 85% of 90% of 1-RM: 3 x 3, 100 lb
  • 95% of 90% of 1-RM: 3 x 1, 110 lb
  • 95% of true 1-RM: singles, 3 x 1, 125 lb

 

  • DB chest press ( on the floor): 5 x 15, 40 lb
  • Incline DB press reverse grip: 5 x 15, 40 lb
  • Hammer grip incline DB press: 5 x 15, 40 lb

Ab workout:

  • Cable crunch: 4 x 20, 100 lb
  • Vertical leg raises: 4 x 20

Cardio workout:

  • Stair climber: 20 minutes, level 7