Groin Pull/Groin Strain (Injury/injury prevention)

This post is not meant to be inappropriate, because groin injuries have happened to some people and are common with most contact sports. 

 

Groin pull? 

Also known as ‘groin strain” , is a tear/rupture to the to any of the adductor muscles resulting pain in the inner thigh. Range from mild to very severe. 

 

Causes: 

 
  • Known to occur when sprinting or changing direction quickly
  • during rapid movements of the leg against resistance 
  • over stretching the muscle
  • having weak adductor muscles
  • not warming up properly
  • tight adductor muscles
  • previous injury to that particular area
  • sometimes lower back injuries can contribute to this injury as well

Symptoms:

  • Sharp pain in the groin area
  • swelling
  • discomfort
  • bruising 

symptoms depend on the severity of the injury.

 

Treatment:

  • Protect the area, ice it, rest it, compress it, and elevate it if possible
  • wearing a groin support can be helpful 
  • sports massage could be useful after 72 hours
  • electrotherapy by medical doctors is said to help the healing process

Every case is on an individualized basis, so make sure to contact your medical professional for further information/help

 

Have you experienced a groin pull, how long did it take to heal? what procedure did you use to help the healing process – leave answers in the comment section. 

If you enjoyed the post, like, comment, share and follow!

 

Fitness WonderWoman,

Shay-lon xo

Advertisements

The R.I.C.E Method

Hello Bloggers,

Today’s blog post will be super short because I am having to work today and got to put a rush order on things. Nonetheless, I decided to vaguely speak on the above method called the “R.I.C.E Method” – which  is: rest, ice, compression and elevation. Now some of you are well aware of this method, which is splendid and others of you probably have never heard of it – either way it is something to remember when an accident happens. 

 

I should mention that each year sometimes methods change, and so if your company, organization, schooling , etc says this is not the method to use any longer, than feel free to ignore it and use whatever one works best for you, but because I was told to follow this method not too long ago by a professional, I choose to continue to use it for the time being. 

 

When to use this method?

 
  • A.S.A.P after an injury; such as a sprain.

The Reason people use this method? 

  • To relieve pain, swelling and promote healing along with flexibility. 

Thanks for reading, be sure to like, comment, share and follow!

 

Fitness WonderWoman,

Shay-lon xo

Sprains

sprains

Well finally after having time to make some new content, I thought I would start it off with an injury, something most people can relate to and would not like to happen to them. First of all, how many of you have had a sprain?! (Raise of hands) and how many of you knew how to handle your sprain? (Raise of hands), okay, okay! seems like we have a good number of people in the blogosphere who have been in this situation once or twice before. Personally I have never had a sprain (that I can remember) although you would think my chances would have been higher considering I was a track athlete and basketball player and they tend to get sprains fairly often but I suppose I got lucky (knock on wood). Today, I won’t go too in-depth about this injury because it isn’t hard to comprehend, but I want to make sure everyone is aware of this injury if it should happen to them. Also, feel free to share your stories in the comment section. 

Sprain: A stretching or tearing of ligaments (the fibrous tissue that connects joints and bones) 

Some of the more common types of sprains:

  1. Sprained ankle
  2. Sprained thumb
  3. Sprained wrist
  4. Sprained knee
Symptoms:
  • Pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising
  • Limited ability to move the affected joint
  • At the time of injury, you may hear or feel a ‘pop’ in your joint
Risk Factors to consider:
  1. Poor conditioning
  2. Fatigue
  3. Improper warm-up
  4. Environmental conditions
  5. Poor equipment
Treatment:
  • Medications- some Ibuprofen or Tylenol may help with the pain for minor sprains
  • Apply ice as soon as possible to minimize swelling – in worse case scenarios the doctor may decide to use a splint or brace
  • Elevate the affected area
  • One may choose to use compression bandages (unless you notice more swelling, more pain, etc)
  • Rest- avoid activities that cause pain. 
Mild-moderate sprains are said to heal within 3-6 weeks, over the course you should be gradually using the area that is affected unless a doctor says differently. In any case, you should contact your doctor if pain, swelling, or other symptoms become a problem. 
Your fitness blogger,
Shay-lon xxx