Last day of May workout

Warm up:

 
  • Smith machine calf raises: 4 x 25, 25 lbs
  • Glute kickback: 4 x 25 ea. leg
  • Kettlebell stiff legged deadlift: 4 x 25, 4 kg

Workout:

  • Sumo deadlift: 4 x 1-2 (90% 1RM, 200 lbs)/ 4 x 1-2 (100% 1RM, 225 lbs) 
  • Barbell back squat: 4 x 1-2 (90% 1RM, 180 lbs)/ 4 x 1-2 (100% 1RM, 200 lbs) 

Tri-set:

  • Smith machine vertical leg press: 5 x 8-10, 205 lbs
  • EZ bar stationary lunges: 5 x 8-10, 30 lbs
  • body bar overhead squat: 5 x 8-10, 15 lbs

Tri-set:

  • Kettlebell goblet squat: 5 x 8-10, 8 kg
  • EZ bar push press: 5 x 8-10, 40 lbs
  • Kettlebell stiff legged deadlift: 5 x 8-10, 8 kg

I hit a new PR in the sumo deadlift, 250 lbs

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Wall Ball Squat| CrossFit It Out

Going back to my CrossFit days when I was introduced to “Wall Ball Squats” — for the life of me,  I did not realize they would be a challenging workout; I figured what is so hard about squatting and throwing a ball against a wall BUT boy was I wrong! hard workout and definitely made to be challenging. Eventually I will get back into CrossFit and visit my local box BUT it won’t be because of Wall balls, LOL 

For any of my CrossFit athletes out there, then you know the struggle and for any of my recreational gym goers this is an exercise to amp up your leg day and core as well 🙂 

but obviously you can purchase them elsewhere as well, but the reason behind using these balls is because of the cushion compared to regular medicine balls made of hard rubber that would go bouncing off the walls, they don’t look fierce but these balls don’t play games with competitors. LOL 

 

So besides that, how does one do a proper wall ball squat? 

 
 
  1. Stand feet shoulder width apart while facing the wall with the “wall ball in hand”. Make sure to keep shoulders back and chest up high, standing 3-5 ft away from the wall (approximately) 
  2. Descent into a squat position, continue down until upper legs are below parallel to the floor (inhale during this time)
  3. Drive through heels to ascend, at the same time push the medicine ball up towards the wall while fully extending the arms. Aim to throw the ball 10-12 ft in front of you (although it depends the height of the ceiling)
  4. Catch the ball and return to the starting position. 

What muscles am I working?

  • Quads
  • glutes
  • calves
  • hamstrings
  • abs
  • lower back
  • chest
  • front deltoids
  • rear deltoids
  • biceps
  • triceps

Very good workout for the muscle groups and definitely can be done with beginners, just use a smaller weight and start off throwing the ball as a decent height and gradually progress as you get stronger and get the movement down.

 

Leave your experience in the comments!

 

Shay-lon

Smith Machine Vs The Barbell

Hello fellow bloggers,

Today’s fun topic of discussion for all my fit crazed people is: smith machine vs barbell. Now for many of you; you have a preference and some of you choose to only one use or the other depending on your fitness level. 

If you are not aware of what a “smith machine” is, here is a link: Smith machine article , the particular article highlights why they enjoy using the smith machine. If you aren’t aware of what a barbell is, look at the image above. 

 

I’ll begin by expressing that I have used both the smith machine and the barbell and I have a  preference depending on the exercise I am doing at the time. I believe both can be useful for different reasons and depending on the person; so I am going to do a separate list of both with the pros and cons of each 🙂 

 

Smith Machine:

 
  • Good for de-conditioned persons
  • don’t have to use a spotter
  • light weight
  • typically found at commercial gyms
  • wide variety of exercises can be done
  • not recommended for deadlifts & Squats
  • plane of motion is fixed
  • not recommended for olympic lifts 
  • harder to develop stabilizer muscles
  • not functional – meaning because of the movement being “fixed” you aren’t using the same ROM you normally would have to during everyday activities
  • Good for safety
  • good for hypertrophy training
  • good for when someone has an injury
 

The Barbell:

  • Found in a lot of powerlifting, athletic and some commercial gyms
  • goes through full ROM
  • heavier bar
  • advanced athletes and intermediate athletes
  • need a spotter for the heavier weights
  • used for olympic weights, squats, deadlifts, etc
  • functional
  • non fixed plane of motion
  • strength,hyperstrophy and endurance training
  • allows you to use your stabilizer muscles
  • beginners should use with caution 
  • variety of exercises can be done using the barbell
  • can give you calluses on your hands 

Basically both list have their pros and cons. I find that the smith machine does well with my vertical leg presses — whereas I wouldn’t use the barbell for it because it wouldn’t be able to go through the plane of motion without hurting myself. The barbell is awesome for olympic lifts and deadlifts, whereas it is MUCH MUCH harder to perform these exercises on a smith machine because of the fixed motion. Now, there is another HUGE important factor to consider when utilizing the smith machine – Your strength from the smith machine does not transfer over to the barbell. This basically means those of you who are lifting 300 lb squats on the smith machine, most likely will end up lifting lighter on the barbell because the smith machine is lighter and offers less resistance than the barbell. Many times athletes will use the smith machine for a while and then when they decide to hop on the barbell, they realize they aren’t as strong as they originally thought. Keep this in mind while training. Otherwise, choose what works best for you, I think it is a good idea to implement both into a workout or to have a least one that is a preference but to know how to use the other as back up. 

 

Let me know which you prefer . 

 

Leave comments, share, likes and follow. 

 
 
 

What is ‘Tabata’

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nKlU42Z51tU

Let me be honest by saying, I had never heard of ‘tabata” before taking an exercise science class where one of my former classmates was doing a workout with her client, and I decided to ask what it was and she explained to me that it was called “tabata”. Watching her and her client do the workout made me sick thinking about it, because it was so high intensity and had so many rounds, not to mention the exercises weren’t exactly that easy in the first place (Although there are more beginner tabata workouts for those starting out).  Don’t get me wrong, I have done high intensity workouts, and survived just fine, but have never done tabata, and still haven’t done it. I have been thinking about it, but first wanted to see what was all out there and of course there are many different tabata workouts depending on your skill level, goals, and whether you want to use equipment or not.  I will begin by saying if one didn’t know any better they would normally call it a regular circuit exercise, but actually tabata is different in nature and I want to share with you what Tabata is and what it does for the body depending on what your goals are.

 

‘Tabata’ – A form of HIIT training, it consist of eight rounds of ultra high intensity exercises in a specific 20 seconds-on, 10 seconds-off interval.   (The video will give you some insight)

 

What to know about ‘Tabata’:

 
  • Fitness & weight loss benefits
  • Short workout usually no more than 20 minutes long, but it can go longer depending on the class and how long you choose to go
  • The name was invented by the physician and researcher Dr. Izumi Tabata who conducted a study to see if athletes could benefit from a 20/10 HIIT training. 
  • Some may argue to say Tabata is not for beginners, I would say, it isn’t something I would start a beginner off with, but one can do it with practice and discipline. A beginner tabata class may be slow paced at first but eventually it will get faster and harder, so one should be at certain fitness level before jumping into this routine. 
  • Greater risk of injury, because of it being HIIT , something to speak with your doctor about if you have prior injuries or conditions that need to be evaluated before starting Tabata. I would say it is greater risk if you don’t know how to perform the movements with proper form/technique. 
  • Anaerobic and aerobic capacity increase

I would highly recommend that you watch some videos on Tabata to get an idea of what it is, and the type of exercises that can be included in it. Here is a short list of exercises that are popular:

  • mountain climbers
  • planks
  • sit ups
  • burpees
  • squats

but many more other exercises one can add to their tabata routine. I would also recommend that you wait until you are at a comfortable fitness level (fairly high) so that you can do the exercises with minimal injuries, and are able to keep up with the 20 seconds on and 10 seconds off routine. I hope those of you who have done tabata can share your experience with me and others, letting us know if you enjoyed it.  Thank you for reading, please feel free to share this! 

 

Your fitness blogger,

 

Shay-lon xoxo

 “Shay-lon is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com

 

Hotels with Gyms

hotels-with-gyms

Hello bloggers!

Have any of you ever booked a hotel based on it having a fitness facility (among other amenities) and because you booked a luxury or upscale or semi upscale hotel, you assumed all their amenities would also be that way, but when you arrive and after checking out the place, you are distraught by the size and lack of equipment the hotel gym provided. I know I have many of times, and it bugs me to think that my workout can be compromised because of the lack of equipment.  In the recent years that I have booked hotels, I don’t normally book the most expensive hotel and I don’t book the lowest priced hotels, but stay somewhere in the middle if possible and base my search on location, amenities and reviews that I read online (not to mention the pictures) and obviously the price of the room each night.  I tend to always like my hotels to come stocked with a gym, because well, I like being able to still workout whenever I am out of town unless provided I am spending more time with someone and less time on my own but it seems like the more hotels that I have gone to, the smaller the gym and more inadequate it is.  Almost makes me laugh when I see a gym with one treadmill, one elliptical machine and one dumbbell with a yoga mat (yes this has happened to me before).  Most people might find this to not be of a bother because the pool, the hot tub, the space of the room, location, and space inside in the room seem to the most important aspects when others look for hotels, but for me, I want a good quality gym and if not in the hotel, I am always hoping there is one nearby that I have a membership for or I am doomed to use what I have. 

I am going to share with you ways to cope with a gym that is lacking when you are staying in a hotel

  1. Check out the location of the hotel, is there a gym near you?
  2. is the hotel located on a safe road where running is a option (outside)
  3. do you have any family or friends in the area that have a gym membership or can provide you with information on nearby parks, etc
  4. does the hotel have a gym?
  5. bring your own equipment (small things) no need to pack the whole gym with you, but bring small dumbbells, kettlebells, TRX, etc with you if you wish to use them
  6. ask the hotel rep what their gym is like
  7. make do with what the hotel gym has, if it has cardio machines, use them.  If it has one dumbbell and a mat, be creative.
  8. Look at reviews to get an idea if anyone mentions the gym 
  9. do some online researching to see if any of the hotels in the surrounding area are said to have good quality gym facilities
  10. how long is your stay, is it going to be a HUGE deal if the gym sucks?
  11. bring dvds if the room has a dvd player and do workouts via the TV
  12. is there a swimming pool, if so, use that to get a good workout in. Swimming is a total body exercise
  13. Go for a walk to nearby shops and eateries, to get out and move
  14. rent a bike for a day if possible and ride around the area
  15. you can do crunches, push ups, planks, mountain climbers, supermans, side bends, etc all in your room. NOT ALL EXERCISES REQUIRE A GYM!!
Hopefully this list of ideas will help those of you who have had this same issue.  Sometimes you have to prepare for things to not always be perfect, so when you book a hotel, try to think outside of the box, especially when you are expecting a lavish stay and want the works.  The gym facility doesn’t have to be top of the line in order to be of use to you.  Not all exercises require a gym, sometimes you have to be creative and to be honest with you, as long as it makes sense, creativity can be a great source of exercise. Thank you for reading.
Feel free to share, comment and like this blog post. Also, if anyone has anything they would like to add to this list, please feel free to do so!
Your fitness blogger,
Shay-lon xoxo