Hamstring Strain (injury/injury prevention)

I hope you know where your hamstrings are located, because today we will be talking about “pulling a hamstring” — (Pst, just in case you don’t know where your hamstrings are, look at the above picture). This particular injury is more common than you think, especially among runners and people who lift improperly- and those with imbalances. Think of it as a big OUCH! you definitely feel it; but don’t take my word for it, ask anyone who has experienced one.  I’d like to be the one to give you some inner insight on the matter and possible share some fun tips, advice, and prepare you for what is possible – but I always recommend talking with a medical doctor for more support and answers and of course for help with any injury (they are the professionals) – lol. 

 

What is a hamstring strain you ask?

A tear that occurs in one of the hamstring muscles – range from mild to very severe. 

 

How do I know I am experiencing this?

Trust me when I say, YOU WILL FEEL IT, YOU WILL KNOW WHEN IT HAPPENS! with that being said, normally there is a sharp pain at the back of the thigh. If it is more severe, you might notice some swelling or bruising in that area as well. 

 

I don’t want this to happen to you, so.. 

Pay particular attention to your exercises and how you are doing them

 

when stretching, stretch properly

 

When sprinting.. well.. you are a taking a chance because it tends to happen to runners. But don’t allow this to keep you from running! 

 

Treatment please:

 
  • Protection, ice, compression, elevation and rest
  • cold therapy and compression wraps should be used immediately and applied for 10-15 minutes and repeat it every hour for the 1st day. 
  • compression bandage and thigh supports are helpful to reduce swelling and help with the internal bleeding
  • After the initial acute stage, you have a choice to use hot and cold alternating between the two.
  • Using a foam roller will be helpful
  • Professional therapist can perform massages on the area
  • rehab may be necessary if more severe from a physical therapist

In all honesty this isn’t an injury you want to obtain and if it does happen, it isn’t the end of the world, but it might hurt a whole lot. Just for kicks, who has “pulled a hamstring” muscle before? how long did it take for yours to heal? I would love to hear everyone’s answers in the comment box & do me a favor.. 

 

Share, like, comment and follow! Thanks!

 

Fitness WonderWoman,

Shay-lon xo

Advertisements

Groin Pull/Groin Strain (Injury/injury prevention)

This post is not meant to be inappropriate, because groin injuries have happened to some people and are common with most contact sports. 

 

Groin pull? 

Also known as ‘groin strain” , is a tear/rupture to the to any of the adductor muscles resulting pain in the inner thigh. Range from mild to very severe. 

 

Causes: 

 
  • Known to occur when sprinting or changing direction quickly
  • during rapid movements of the leg against resistance 
  • over stretching the muscle
  • having weak adductor muscles
  • not warming up properly
  • tight adductor muscles
  • previous injury to that particular area
  • sometimes lower back injuries can contribute to this injury as well

Symptoms:

  • Sharp pain in the groin area
  • swelling
  • discomfort
  • bruising 

symptoms depend on the severity of the injury.

 

Treatment:

  • Protect the area, ice it, rest it, compress it, and elevate it if possible
  • wearing a groin support can be helpful 
  • sports massage could be useful after 72 hours
  • electrotherapy by medical doctors is said to help the healing process

Every case is on an individualized basis, so make sure to contact your medical professional for further information/help

 

Have you experienced a groin pull, how long did it take to heal? what procedure did you use to help the healing process – leave answers in the comment section. 

If you enjoyed the post, like, comment, share and follow!

 

Fitness WonderWoman,

Shay-lon xo

Athlete’s Foot (health/injury)

Wednesday Injury/health condition chats. This one might sound familiar to some of you. Have you heard of athlete’s foot? I first heard of it in middle school when a coach of mine was talking to a fellow classmate about it, but to say I have had it, would be a lie but luckily after doing research during college and learning some things, I am now more understanding of what this is. Hopefully this post will be helpful to you as well.

 

What Is Athlete’s Foot?

A fungal infection that effects the skin on the feet and is considered contagious. 

Just an Fyi, it has been known to spread to hands and toenails. 

 

There are more mild cases and some that are very severe – I shown a picture that wasn’t severe, but feel free to look at some of the more severe cases, they can be very scary. 

 

Causes?

 
  • Direct contact from someone who has it
  • touching surfaces contaminated with it
  • Can be found in locker rooms, around swimming pools and in warm & damp areas

Risk Factors:

  • Visiting public places barefoot
  • Sharing socks, shoes or towels with an infected person
  • wearing tight fitted , closed-toed shoes
  • sweaty feet
  • Minor skin or nail injury on your foot
  • keeping the feet wet for prolonged periods of time

Symptoms:

  • itching, stinging and burning between the toes
  • itching, stinging and burning on the soles of the foot
  • Blisters on the feet that itch
  • cracking and peeling skin on the feet
  • dry skin on the soles or sides of the feet
  • discolored, thick and crumbling toenails
  • toenails that pull away from the nail bed

Most doctor’s will diagnose this infection by doing a skin test or from the symptoms described

 

Treatment:

  • OTC medications (over the counter)
  • Prescription medications
  • home care – soaking feet in salt water or diluted vinegar to dry up the blisters

Something to keep in mind about Athlete’s foot, is that it can lead to more severe cases if someone is allergic to the fungus or if it goes untreated it can cause other issues with worse consequences. There are other alternatives to ridding of athlete’s foot but the above listed are some of the more popular ways. Be sure to consult with your doctor. 

 

Fitness WonderWoman,

 

Shay-lon xo

When in doubt .. cream it out..

“We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.”

Sprains

sprains

Well finally after having time to make some new content, I thought I would start it off with an injury, something most people can relate to and would not like to happen to them. First of all, how many of you have had a sprain?! (Raise of hands) and how many of you knew how to handle your sprain? (Raise of hands), okay, okay! seems like we have a good number of people in the blogosphere who have been in this situation once or twice before. Personally I have never had a sprain (that I can remember) although you would think my chances would have been higher considering I was a track athlete and basketball player and they tend to get sprains fairly often but I suppose I got lucky (knock on wood). Today, I won’t go too in-depth about this injury because it isn’t hard to comprehend, but I want to make sure everyone is aware of this injury if it should happen to them. Also, feel free to share your stories in the comment section. 

Sprain: A stretching or tearing of ligaments (the fibrous tissue that connects joints and bones) 

Some of the more common types of sprains:

  1. Sprained ankle
  2. Sprained thumb
  3. Sprained wrist
  4. Sprained knee
Symptoms:
  • Pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising
  • Limited ability to move the affected joint
  • At the time of injury, you may hear or feel a ‘pop’ in your joint
Risk Factors to consider:
  1. Poor conditioning
  2. Fatigue
  3. Improper warm-up
  4. Environmental conditions
  5. Poor equipment
Treatment:
  • Medications- some Ibuprofen or Tylenol may help with the pain for minor sprains
  • Apply ice as soon as possible to minimize swelling – in worse case scenarios the doctor may decide to use a splint or brace
  • Elevate the affected area
  • One may choose to use compression bandages (unless you notice more swelling, more pain, etc)
  • Rest- avoid activities that cause pain. 
Mild-moderate sprains are said to heal within 3-6 weeks, over the course you should be gradually using the area that is affected unless a doctor says differently. In any case, you should contact your doctor if pain, swelling, or other symptoms become a problem. 
Your fitness blogger,
Shay-lon xxx