Thursday, Sept. 28th Workout

Traps, Lats & Forearms (Light weights, higher reps)

 

Workout:

Superset:

 
  • Chin ups: 3 x 15-20
  • Barbell shrugs: 3 x 15-20, 135 lb

Superset:

  • Close grip front lat pulldown: 3 x 15-20, 90 lb
  • Plate shrugs: 3 x 15-20, 90 lb

Superset:

  • Full ROM lat pulldown: 3 x 15-20, 40 lb
  • Finger curls: 3 x 15-20, 20 lb

Superset:

  • Palms down DB wrist curl: 3 x 15-20
  • rope straight arm pulldown: 3 x 15-20, 50 lb
  • DB shrugs: 3 x 15-20, 60 lb

Pull ups: 3 x 5

 

Cardio:

  1. Jump rope: 1 minute
  2. Jump rope: 45 seconds
  3. Jump rope: 30 seconds
  4. Jump rope 1 minute
  5. Jump rope: 45 seconds
  6. Jump rope: 30 seconds
  7. Jump rope: 1 minute

HIIT Training (3 rounds)

 
  1. Flutter kicks: 15 seconds
  2. Sitting twist: 15 seconds
  3. Leg raises: 15 seconds
  4. Raised leg circles: 15 seconds

1 minute rest between rounds. 

 

I will be the first to say that my hiit training today was challenging, it was my first time performing leg circles and leg raises as ab workout but it was challenging for sure, don’t think I could have lasted longer than 15 seconds. I did those 3 sets of pull ups and barely could do 2 because by then my traps and lats were sore! but the chin ups came easy and of course the jump rope was fun! Overall a good workout!

 

Fitness WonderWoman,

Shay-lon xo

 

P.S a lot of people forget to work their wrist and forearm muscles, but do know it is very important, so start implementing them as part of your workout! if you need some ideas, hit me up!

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Groin Pull/Groin Strain (Injury/injury prevention)

This post is not meant to be inappropriate, because groin injuries have happened to some people and are common with most contact sports. 

 

Groin pull? 

Also known as ‘groin strain” , is a tear/rupture to the to any of the adductor muscles resulting pain in the inner thigh. Range from mild to very severe. 

 

Causes: 

 
  • Known to occur when sprinting or changing direction quickly
  • during rapid movements of the leg against resistance 
  • over stretching the muscle
  • having weak adductor muscles
  • not warming up properly
  • tight adductor muscles
  • previous injury to that particular area
  • sometimes lower back injuries can contribute to this injury as well

Symptoms:

  • Sharp pain in the groin area
  • swelling
  • discomfort
  • bruising 

symptoms depend on the severity of the injury.

 

Treatment:

  • Protect the area, ice it, rest it, compress it, and elevate it if possible
  • wearing a groin support can be helpful 
  • sports massage could be useful after 72 hours
  • electrotherapy by medical doctors is said to help the healing process

Every case is on an individualized basis, so make sure to contact your medical professional for further information/help

 

Have you experienced a groin pull, how long did it take to heal? what procedure did you use to help the healing process – leave answers in the comment section. 

If you enjoyed the post, like, comment, share and follow!

 

Fitness WonderWoman,

Shay-lon xo

Athlete’s Foot (health/injury)

Wednesday Injury/health condition chats. This one might sound familiar to some of you. Have you heard of athlete’s foot? I first heard of it in middle school when a coach of mine was talking to a fellow classmate about it, but to say I have had it, would be a lie but luckily after doing research during college and learning some things, I am now more understanding of what this is. Hopefully this post will be helpful to you as well.

 

What Is Athlete’s Foot?

A fungal infection that effects the skin on the feet and is considered contagious. 

Just an Fyi, it has been known to spread to hands and toenails. 

 

There are more mild cases and some that are very severe – I shown a picture that wasn’t severe, but feel free to look at some of the more severe cases, they can be very scary. 

 

Causes?

 
  • Direct contact from someone who has it
  • touching surfaces contaminated with it
  • Can be found in locker rooms, around swimming pools and in warm & damp areas

Risk Factors:

  • Visiting public places barefoot
  • Sharing socks, shoes or towels with an infected person
  • wearing tight fitted , closed-toed shoes
  • sweaty feet
  • Minor skin or nail injury on your foot
  • keeping the feet wet for prolonged periods of time

Symptoms:

  • itching, stinging and burning between the toes
  • itching, stinging and burning on the soles of the foot
  • Blisters on the feet that itch
  • cracking and peeling skin on the feet
  • dry skin on the soles or sides of the feet
  • discolored, thick and crumbling toenails
  • toenails that pull away from the nail bed

Most doctor’s will diagnose this infection by doing a skin test or from the symptoms described

 

Treatment:

  • OTC medications (over the counter)
  • Prescription medications
  • home care – soaking feet in salt water or diluted vinegar to dry up the blisters

Something to keep in mind about Athlete’s foot, is that it can lead to more severe cases if someone is allergic to the fungus or if it goes untreated it can cause other issues with worse consequences. There are other alternatives to ridding of athlete’s foot but the above listed are some of the more popular ways. Be sure to consult with your doctor. 

 

Fitness WonderWoman,

 

Shay-lon xo

When in doubt .. cream it out..

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Phase Two: Week Four. Day 24| Six Weeks To Shreds

Warm up:

 
  • 2-3 minute skipping in place

Workout:

  • Bentover barbell row: 4 x 9-11. 70 lb (1 minute skipping in place between sets)
  • DB incline row: 3 x 9-11. 70 lb ( 1 minute goblet squat – 30 lb between sets)
  • Seated cable rows: 3 x 9-11.  120 lb ( 1 minute box jumps between each set)
  • Barbell shrug: 4 x 9-11. 155 lb (1 minute DB step ups – 20 lb between each set)
  • Barbell curl: 3 x 9-11. 45 lb (1 minute kettlebell swings- 8kg between each set)
  • seated barbell curl: 3 x 9-11. 30 lb (1 minute med ball slams – 10 lb between each set)
  • Reverse barbell curl: 3 x 9-11. 45 lb. (1 minute DB lunge-20 lb between each set)

Today I was not feeling it, I was fatigued before getting started and just aching a bit. I don’t think it is over training ( not quite that bad) .. I just think it is about that time again (if you know what I mean). I couldn’t finish a whole minute of med ball slams without stopping and I hardly slammed the ball hard enough to make a noise, I was just barely getting by on my workout today, BUT with all that being said, I made some good progress compared to my week one results. If you are interested in seeing the results from week one to now, click Here

 

Anyone else have a long day at the gym today, or just not feeling today’s workout? 

 

Fitness Wonder Woman,

 

Shay-lon xo

now for those of you who are working on building strength and need something lighter to get started, my gym used body bars with some of their clients and in college I started with one for a class or two and let me tell you, they come real handy!

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Guest Post- Treadmill Running or Outdoor Running: What’s the difference?

Hello bloggers, 

Today I have a guest post written by Lindy Schwarts on the difference between running on the treadmill and running outdoors. I know many of my followers are avid runners and for those of you who want to start running, this article will be just as helpful for you as well. I hope that many of you will enjoy this article.  Lindy contacted me about wanting to guest post for my blog after reading one of my more recent blog post and sharing her appreciation for my written work, after learning that she enjoys fitness and has a blog that talks about fitness machines, I felt that it would be more than appropriate to have her as a guest post because believe it or not, I learned quite a bit from this article. I want all of you to keep an open mind, there is no right or wrong answer but this article will help to give you perspective. Thank you Lindy for writing such a great piece! 

Treadmill running or outdoor running: What’s the difference?

No matter where you do it, a run is still a run. Based on researchers, a treadmill run is just as effective as an outdoor run. For years, runners glorify the benefits of outdoor running. Yet, as the outdoor environment in most areas of the world becomes harsher, running on a treadmill becomes the second option. Treadmill users enjoy the convenience that each running sessions bring. However, running purists maintain that there is no substitute for outdoor running. They maintain that the benefits of running outside outweigh the benefits of using the treadmill. A question frequently asked by runners and even now – runners alike is if treadmill running can build the same endurance as running outside. Runners – beginners and experts alike are also mulling about this great question: Is there a difference between outdoor running and treadmill running?

 

On the level of difficulty

 

Treadmill running is easier since there is a belt that assists the leg for the easy turnover. This has directed the runner’s pace so much so that runners coming from treadmill running find out that their pace on the treadmill does to correlate to outdoor running. The rearward motion of the belt helps the runner in his stride and rhythm patterns. This reduces the need to drive your weight forward. The treadmill’s belt is also cushioned as compared to the hard pavement, so the impact of the movements on the joints is also reduced. This is especially beneficial to those who are overweight or prone to injury.

It is also easier to run on a treadmill, there is no wind resistance. In an outdoor run, the legs should be propelled forward and pushing against the wind resistance. However, sports researchers have found a way to make running on the treadmill the same as that of running outdoors. The research showed that if you adjust the setting of the treadmill, to a 1% incline or grade, then the machine can very well simulate the conditions when running outdoors. It stimulates the effort and energy cost the same as that of running outdoors. Therefore, it makes the runner’s pace similar to the pace taken on running outside.

As it is easier to run on the treadmill, running enthusiasts should utilize them for speed training. One can increase the speed at a shorter interval then make it slower at the recovery phase.

Convenience is the name

With the increased awareness and adherence to wellness programs, the establishment of gyms and health clubs has become very common today. It is not surprising to see gyms of all types popping up in the neighbourhood. Hopping onto a treadmill has never been easier.

As most of us have already sworn to follow the tech – savvy lifestyle, the use of the trackers, gadgets and even phone are easier when you are indoor and running on a treadmill. The presence of the accessories and gadgets in the exercise equipment are delivering videos, news and music allow you to multitask while keeping fit.

The treadmill machine, as well as the environment where one is running, is simply consistent. The room’s temperature is controlled and one can control and manipulate the surrounding. The treadmill allows the runner to set a phase then maintain it. This will be beneficial if the runner wants to build his stamina or training for a particular event like a marathon. It helps the runner sustain his determination if it seems to be weakened. Running outside sometimes makes it harder to keep constant track of the runner’s progress while in the treadmill, all the essential biometrics data can be programmed. There are machines that can accurately measure heart rate and calories burned. They also allows you to monitor your progress like the speed, distance and calorie burned.

Dealing with the elements

 

Most runners would say that it is easier to run on the treadmill as you are not dealing with the elements in nature. Harsh temperatures like the scorching heat during summer and the bitter cold during the winter.  Ironically, the lack of the elements in nature when treadmill running also makes it less preferable for some runners. Researchers also pointed out that exercising in green spaces in nature was associated with greater relaxation, the decrease in the tension and anger. The results revealed that people who exercised in nature find the activity more enjoyable as it has given them better mood, better relaxation, and even better sleep.

The outdoor environment gives runner’s visual cues which somehow signals that the finish line is almost near. In the treadmill, the redundant views on the wall might not motivate the runner enough to push for more. The moderate exposure to the sunlight helps in the synthesis of Vitamin D and this is another advantage being in the outdoors.

Since we are assured that we still get the adequate exercise even in the extreme weather and environmental condition. Access to a treadmill means that there is really no excuse to miss out on the running schedules and attaining fitness.

Pushing yourself some more

 

In outdoor running, going beyond your threshold can be difficult. Using the treadmill makes it easier to push yourself for more. The machine enables you to take control of your speed, incline, and duration at a touch of a button. Setting a pace then maintaining it is easier on a treadmill. This is useful if you are training for a specific event or just looking to improve your stamina endurance. It is also helpful to keep you going when your determination is wavering. As a runner, you can easily monitor your progress on speed, distance and calorie counter displays.

Risks to take

 

Outdoor running puts you at the risks of injuries due to falls or missteps, there’s pollution from traffic to contend with. If we run on the streets, we might be at risk for accidents. The exposure to the harsh weather can make us vulnerable to diseases.

However, there are also risks to using the treadmill even in the controlled environment of the gym. The repetitive running motion that you do on the flat surface of the treadmill makes you at risk for joint and ligament injuries. When on a treadmill, it is better to have a variety of movements and set them at varying speed. Outdoor runners are also vulnerable to these risks especially if they only run on a concrete pavement. The changes in your strides due to the changes in the terrain has a beneficial effect in lowering your risk for injury. The more you adapt your movements to the curbs, hill or corners, the less likely you overuse the same muscle. For those with injury, it is best to use the treadmill to prevent further damage.

Treadmill running has already evolved from being an inferior form of running as compared to outdoor running. There is a specific circumstance which will push even the staunchest fan of the outdoor running to use the treadmill. Using the treadmill can be very effective knowing that we can customize this machine according to our needs. If we are able to adjust the speed and the incline, then we may have the best option for running in our hand. You and your body shall determine what surface that is best for you and this will determine the outcome of the debate.

 

Lindy Schwarts of https://amazingmachines.info. I’m a very active women. My passions in life are Fitness, Yoga, Golfing and Kids. I started earlier this year playing a Little around with websites and I can say that’s a new challenge unlike anything else!

 

The “Female Triad” – Have you heard of it?

Female athletes beware… 

 

It is possible you have experienced this as a female athlete or maybe your child is experiencing this OR it could be that you know someone who is experiencing this. Most females have experienced this depending on the sports they played and how serious they took their athletics – many coaches and parents might not see anything wrong with it because it comes with being an athlete having the mindset of being the best, but what happens when being the best is causing health issues and making it harder on you in the long term and short term. 

 

What is the female Triad?

 
  • A syndrome in which eating disorders, amenorrhoea, and decreased bone mineral density are present. Primarily caused by an energy deficiency. 

Now you would assume, how is this considered normal? well it isn’t. Sadly, many people don’t stop to question these things until it is too late or don’t see the signs right away because they don’t pay close enough attention, or possibly because their teenager is avoiding the topic and allowing the guardian to believe all is well when it is NOT. As athletes, you know we have to make sacrifices and some can be harmful and some can be good, but we make these sacrifices because we want to be the best at whatever we do and we don’t want to make the coach or our teammates upset – we have this mindset of win, win, win and any loss is a bad loss. This was my same mindset as well, any loss was a loss I was mad about and the tantrums I would throw and the cussing and the anger and the blaming the players and the constant striving for perfection is all that mattered to me growing up playing sports. It can be tough being an athlete. 

 

We all have our downfalls but this is serious and I want to bring it to your attention in case any of you might be going through it now or know someone who is, so that maybe you can identify it and be more aware and helpful.. if anything, I hope this post teaches you something new.

 

Who is effected?

  • Typically anyone can be effected, but it primarily effects female athletes who participate in sports that emphasize leanness, such as:gymnastics, ballet, diving, figure skating, aerobics, running. Some other classes that include males experiencing this might be: wrestling, rowing, and martial arts. 

Symptoms:

  1. weight loss
  2. absent or irregular periods
  3. fatigue
  4. stress fractures
  5. binge eating 
  6. restrictive dieting
  7. induced vomiting
  8. excessive exercise

Prevention practices:

  1. AVOID emphasis on achieving unrealistically low body weight
  2. avoid out of competition weigh ins
  3. athletes, coaches and parents need to be aware of any warning signs 
  4. rules encouraging excessive weight loss should be discouraged and eliminated. 

Treatment:

  1. The athlete will deny, but medical help is mandatory because it can become serious and eventually cause long term issues if not death.
  2. they should have proper support from coaches, family, friends, teammates
  3. speak with a nutritionist
  4. many times treatment requires some kind of intervention from different specialist and family, friends, etc

Now with this being said, nothing will change if we don’t become the change. We might not be able to save every athlete or change every coach or parent’s mind but we can be aware with both eyes open and speak on this topic when necessary to avoid it happening to yourself, your child or a friend possibly. I am HUGE on body positiveness and preventing females from going down some of the paths I went down knowingly and unknowingly and hopefully helping those who may have questions or concerns dealing with this topic or any of this nature. I am not a medical doctor but I can offer an ear, advice, tips, conversation, etc that might be helpful to an individual. I don’t want men thinking this can’t happen to them, because I know both sexes deal with issues but this specific issue is more prone to female athletes. All I ask is that all of you share this and talk about it with friends and family and social media, make it an issue so that others make it their problem to change how we coach, change our rules that govern these ways of thinking and to hopefully make some type of difference. 

 

Thank you for reading, please feel free to contact me personally, to leave comments, share experiences, follow my blog and social media, and to reblog if you wish as well. 

 

Fitness WonderWoman,

Shay-lon xo

Box Jumps (exercise)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rgPw3tEFZOY

The above video is me demonstrating how to properly do box jumps. Now as simple as they may come, there is a technique to them that can prevent injury. In this blog post, I will go over some key notes to take away from this workout and like all workouts, give you some informative information about the particular exercise. 

 

I personally enjoy doing box jumps, and for more advanced athletes, they are usually using boxes higher than myself (but I had to use what resources I had) – and for the beginners, I would highly recommend a much lower height to get the hang of things. I started  box jumps years ago as an athlete in high school, so this was nothing new to me, but it wasn’t until I started CrossFit that I was doing them more often & now I implement them in my regular workouts too. For those of you who do box jumps, feel free to add your own insight in the comment section and/or achievements of what heights you use for your box jumps, and for those of you who haven’t yet tried this, give it a go and let me know what you think afterwards in the comment section. 

 

How to perform box jumps:

 
  1. Choose a box of an appropriate height (beginners lower heights, more advanced athletes, higher ones) 1-2 feet in front of you, feet should be shoulder width apart and this will be the starting position.
  2. perform a short squat in preparing for the jump, making sure to swing your arms behind you. 
  3. “Rebound” out of this position, extending through the hips, knees and ankles. Make sure to jump as high as possible while swinging your arms forward and up. 
  4. You will land on the box with the knees bent, the impact will be absorbed through the legs, the step down and start again. 

Some key points I want you to keep in mind:

  • You want to land as quietly as possible. There is no need to be obnoxious and loud when landing on the platform. 
  • make sure you are wearing appropriate footwear
  • use a safe platform to jump on 
  • Jump high
  • Do not land with the knees caved in – land with them out
  • jump at a height that both feet can make it on the platform
  • landing on the platform in a deep squat position usually means the height of the platform might be too high for you; you should be landing at half a squat

Now personally I land on my toes while doing box jumps and make sure my heel touches last, but I have heard of athletes saying their coaches tell them to land on their heels and toes touch last and my opinion of that is .. it is awkward and I feel as though I will injure myself doing so and I was always taught toes first then heels. I would suggest my way but if you are being taught a different way then.. I won’t argue with you. 

 

Many athletes will have their heels half off the box when jumping because it is semi quicker than having the whole foot on the box, in my demonstration my whole foot is on the platform, not just half of it. Depending on who is coaching you and their tactics, it could be interchangeable. Some coaches care and others do not. 

 

What muscles are effected by the BOX JUMP? 

  1. Glutes
  2. Quads
  3. Hamstrings
  4. Calves
  5. Hip Flexors

Now this isn’t an exercise you need to implement daily, but it is always good to implement some form of plyos in your workouts, even when training as a runner. The box jump will focus on increasing your strength and muscle tone, builds upper body and lower body and when used as a form of cardio, it is beneficial to burning calories. Hopefully all of you will share your love for box jumps and be sure to leave comments, like, follow and share. Thanks for reading.

 

Fitness WonderWoman,

Shay-lon xo

The R.I.C.E Method

Hello Bloggers,

Today’s blog post will be super short because I am having to work today and got to put a rush order on things. Nonetheless, I decided to vaguely speak on the above method called the “R.I.C.E Method” – which  is: rest, ice, compression and elevation. Now some of you are well aware of this method, which is splendid and others of you probably have never heard of it – either way it is something to remember when an accident happens. 

 

I should mention that each year sometimes methods change, and so if your company, organization, schooling , etc says this is not the method to use any longer, than feel free to ignore it and use whatever one works best for you, but because I was told to follow this method not too long ago by a professional, I choose to continue to use it for the time being. 

 

When to use this method?

 
  • A.S.A.P after an injury; such as a sprain.

The Reason people use this method? 

  • To relieve pain, swelling and promote healing along with flexibility. 

Thanks for reading, be sure to like, comment, share and follow!

 

Fitness WonderWoman,

Shay-lon xo

Week four|day one| 6 weeks to shreds part one

Warm up: 2-3 minute step ups with knee raise

  1. Barbell bench press: 4 x 9-11 (medium grip). 70 lb, 75 lb, 80 lb.  ( 1 minute bench step ups)
  2. Incline DB press: 3 x 9-11, 50 lb. ( 1 minute DB cleans – 30 lb)
  3. Decline DB bench press: 3 x 9-11,  50 lb (1 minute running in place)
  4. Dips: 4 x 9-11 (1 minute kettlebell swings – 15 lb)
  5. Barbell bench press:  4 x 9-11 (close grip) 75 lb (1 minute smith power clean – 75 lb)
  6. Smith machine hip raise: 3 x 9-11. 65 lb. (1 minute step ups)
  7. Hanging leg raise: 3 x 9-11. ( 1 minute quick step ups) 

Today was back to where we were on day one, but this time, my goal was to lift 5-10 lb more weight in each exercise compared to day one (which I did accomplish on all the lifts). The cardio acceleration between each set was to amped up, so I did 2 minutes instead of one minute of each one – which made a whole lot of a difference with my endurance. I am happy with today’s results. Thanks for reading, feel free to leave a comment, like, share, and follow!

 

Fitness WonderWoman,

Shay-lon xxxo

 

 

 

 

 

Email: Shay.moss19@gmail.com

 

Snapchat: milkchocolatemm

 

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I also have a MyFitnessPal app, so if interested, you may add me on there as well. 

My 6 weeks by 6 weeks shred/cut program – Fitness Collab (YouTube)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QPSeYV4rKq0

Hey everyone,  I have started a shred/cut program with a fellow YouTuber from a program she found on Bodybuilding.com.

It is only a 6 week program but to lengthen it, we will be doing it twice. Fun! 

Anyways this video is basically letting you know my goals for it, my macros, my workout from today and what to expect these next 6 weeks .. 

 

Feel free to subscribe to my channel – and follow my social media links! 

 

Your Fitness Blogger,

 

Shay-lon xox